Slide background
Slide background
Slide background
Slide background

We're a Firm with a Unique Personality

We are a reflection of our history. Our firm was founded in 1976 by Brion R. Smoker, who was then joined in 1986 by the late Kevin L. Smith.

Brion and Kevin built a firm focused on providing clients with a higher level of commitment, strong relationships, and quality service. 

That drive and energy has continued and allowed us to serve clients for over 40 years.  Today, we are a full service accounting firm providing cost effective services to businesses and individual clients not only in Central Pennsylvania, but across all borders.

Smoker Smith and Associates, P.C. is a proud member of the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants (PICPA), American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), and INPACT Americas.  Our professionals are active and contributing members of various local and regional professional and communication organizations.

Our heritage has helped us grow into a highly respected firm, one that provides a full range of integrated services. Our heritage continues to guide and sustain us as we work every day to embody our promise of A Higher Level of Commitment.



Reminders & Updates

2022 Standard Mileage Rates

  • 58.5 cents per mile for business miles driven
  • 18 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

2021 Standard Mileage Rates

  • 56 cents per mile for business miles driven
  • 16 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

Check It Out!

Check out the article in PICPA CPA Now by Greg Kashella, published November 2021, Enhanced Financial Statement Disclosures for Small Businesses.

https://www.picpa.org/articles/cpa-now-blog/cpa-now/2021/11/19/financial-statement-disclosure-enhancements-for-small-businesses 

Check out the article in the Central Penn Business Journal, Women Who Lead, March 2019 article featuring our partner Jori Culp

http://www.cpbj.com/article/20190306/CPBJ01/303069999/women-who-lead-jori-m-culp-cpa?fbclid=IwAR1QS3LqoY_P5jEkST4y0QOhRYFYvqzr3UunTpTTFF5PKLUqEfT3JSxd-Tw

Tax-Related Identity Theft

The IRS combats tax-related identity theft with aggressive strategies of prevention, detection and victim assistance. To find out more about tax-related identity theft call our office or visit https://www.irs.gov/identity-theft-fraud-scams/identity-protection for information and guidance.

Remember that the IRS will never contact you by electronic means. This includes emails, phone calls, text messages, or social media channels. If you are ever in doubt whether contact by someone claiming to be from the IRS is legitimate, call our office first for verification.

 

Weekly Tax Brief

Many people own Series E and Series EE bonds that were bought many years ago. They may rarely look at them or think about them except on occasional trips to a file cabinet or safe deposit box.

One of the main reasons for buying U.S. savings bonds (such as Series EE bonds) is the fact that interest can build up without the need to currently report or pay tax on it. The accrued interest is added to the redemption value of the bond and is paid when the bond is eventually cashed in. Unfortunately, the law doesn’t allow for this tax-free buildup to continue indefinitely. The difference between the bond’s purchase price and its redemption value is taxable interest.

Series EE bonds, which have a maturity period of 30 years, were first offered in January 1980. They replaced the earlier Series E bonds.

Currently, Series EE bonds are only issued electronically. They’re issued at face value, and the face value plus accrued interest is payable at maturity.

Before January 1, 2012, Series EE bonds could be purchased on paper. Those paper bonds were issued at a discount, and their face value is payable at maturity. Owners of paper Series EE bonds can convert them to electronic bonds, posted at their purchase price (with accrued interest).

Here’s an example of how Series EE bonds are taxed. Bonds issued in January 1990 reached final maturity after 30 years, in January of 2020. That means that not only have they stopped earning interest, but all of the accrued and as yet untaxed interest was taxable in 2020.

A $1,000 Series EE bond (paper) bought in January 1990 for $500 was worth about $2,073.60 in January of 2020. It won’t increase in value after that. The entire difference of $1,573.60 ($2,073.60 − $500) was taxable as interest in 2020. This interest is exempt from state and local income taxes.

Note: Using the money from EE bonds for higher education may keep you from paying federal income tax on the interest.

If you own bonds (paper or electronic) that are reaching final maturity this year, action is needed to assure that there’s no loss of interest or unanticipated current tax consequences. Check the issue dates on your bonds. One possible place to reinvest the money is in Series I savings bonds, which are currently attractive due to rising inflation resulting in a higher interest rate.

© 2022

339 West Governor Road, Suite 202, Hershey, PA 17033
Phone: (717) 533-5154  •  Toll-Free (888) 277-1040